Spotted Spots.

It was such a treat to have spotted this lovely creature yesterday. Unlike the usual ladybugs that frequent our backyard, this one is like 10mm big. It’s so beautiful that it seems not real – like something that you would want as an accessory… so beautiful it is aptly called a lady. Although not all of them are ladies, of course.

Scientifically known as Coccinellidae, there is a story why it’s called a lady…

In Europe, during the Middle Ages, insects were destroying the crops, so the Catholic farmers prayed to the Virgin Mary for help. Soon the Ladybugs came, ate the plant-destroying pests and saved the crops! The farmers began calling the ladybugs “The Beetles of Our Lady”, and they eventually became known as “Lady Beetles”! The red wings represented the Virgin’s cloak and the black spots represented her joys and sorrows. They didn’t differentiate between males and females.

 For more info and fun facts about ladybugs visit http://www.ladybuglady.com.

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67 thoughts on “Spotted Spots.

  1. Thank you for sharing these beautiful pictures and the story of why these creatures are called lady bugs. I continue to appreciate the fact that you always photograph insects from the vantage point that they have little faces and aren’t just objects. It’s like you believe that they have consciousness, self-hood and, perhaps even souls. Lovely.

    • and i do appreciate that comment… so very much. it gives me great joy that you have seen the profoundness in the photos i took, especially the insects – that there’s more to them than just capturing their images. i am overwhelmed, thank you… thank you very much! 🙂

  2. Thank you for visiting catnipoflife and linking to her post Spirit of the Ladybug. Had you not visited I would not have learned about you:>) Great article and love the pictures! I just Tweeted your page and posted to facebook. Interested in Following each other?

  3. Such beautiful shots from so many different angles. You are either unusually fast with focusing and shooting or had a very cooperative ladybug. I’m just starting out with macro shooting and have not had much success in getting great shots of ladybugs. Thanks for sharing the beauty (and also the story of the origin of the name).

    • hi, thank you very much. i so happy you liked it, it’s my pleasure to share. enjoy your macro… there are millions of subjects for it. i’ve got a lot of macro shots here, you may want to check them out. 🙂 thanks again!

  4. Such beautiful Photos of these cute little Insects. I love nature and animal photos. I am beginner in Photography and just own a digital cam but I start to be nozy about macro photography. Did you have to use a macro lens to make such big photos of a little insect? Lately I browse all this macro photos and I love them. I guess I need a macro lens camera some day too 🙂

    • thank you… and yes, you need a macro lens for macrophotography. i’m using 105mm / 2.8 macro lens. although there are many who uses a prime lens, particularly the 50mm – they just mount it to the camera in reverse using a separate ring or a teleconverter, i think. 🙂

      • Thank you. That all sounds so awesome. I bet this will soon be another expansive hobby for me. why to hell I love all the creative and expansive hobbys 😀 But shooting photos with such a lens make the photos apearr like the view from ant eye´s. it´s awesome.

  5. It looks so unreal. And when you look more closely, you feel as if the spots are growing. I didn’t know the story behind ladybugs. Thank you very much! Wonderful photography! Congrats on being Freshly Pressed!

  6. thank you, that’s so wonderful of you… at it makes me so happy to know people like you who appreciate nature the way i do. thank you!great post thanks

  7. Oh I do so love ladybugs! Thanks for the magical pix. On a holiday in The Netherlands years ago, it was the right time of year, and found myself covered in tiny little orange ones with minuscule black spots… irrationally pleased… 🙂

  8. Pingback: Made Most Delighted By A Moth. « the unbearable lightness of being me.

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